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Organizations are actively seeking women to diversify their cyber security team

Only 11 percent of the world’s information security workforce are women. That’s according to a 2016 research conducted by Women’s Society of Cyberjutsu (WSC), a non-profit organization passionate about empowering women to succeed in cybersecurity.

Over the last four years there’s been improvement. While 50 percent mark for women inclusion in cyber security may seem far away, there are some inspiring institutions aspiring towards this mark; these institutions are already taking steps for 50 percent inclusion of women in their top leadership structures.

According to report, women taking up leadership roles in cybersecurity will increase. Forrester a global research and advisory firm has corroborated this assertion. In its report, Forrester submitted that the number of women CISOs at Fortune 500 companies will rise above the 20 percent mark.

PWC, a big four reported in its 2021 Global Digital Trust Insights, 28 percent of The Global Cybersecurity Workforce are women. (ISC)² in its Cybersecurity Workforce Study puts the figure conservatively at 24 percent. Yet, the figures are rising steadily as several renowned research groups are submitting figures between 21 and 30 percent.

In a recent work group study conducted by shehack.ng, shehacks.ng reported most women no longer feel there will be too much competition in a male dominated tech field. This report has since enjoyed strong backing as industry advocacy has brought this to the fore; also more and more passionate leaders are pushing for inclusion of women in tech.

While some of the shehacks.ng respondents submitted they won’t be able to measure up against their male counterpart owing to the work experience gap, some maintained that the job market is leaning towards cyber inclusion for women.

In its conclusion, shehacks.ng maintained boosting the morals of young women has become imperative, and sustaining mentorship program targeted at young school leavers is very paramount for a win-win women inclusion in cyber.

For women in the tech industry, inspiration and motivation can sometimes be relatively hard to come by. So, here’s the way forward; while the industry has moved way ahead creating a culture for woman inclusion, to sustain this positive trend, the industry must explore inclusion from non-binary work sectors. Intervention such as expanding how company search for talent, identifying other disciplines with relevant skill sets, and making sure institutions create an inclusive culture will lead to a more diverse industry, Forrester has concluded.

Women are no longer taking a back seats, several women are now choosing to challenge the status quo. Also, many young women are learning it is a great time to stand up and follow their passion in cyber security.

Whichever leaning the industry takes, collegiate search for early inclusion of young women is also a way to go, and starting women early in STEM- helping them integrate well into the global community of software developers, coders and ethical hacker will benefit the industry in the long run.

About the Author

Daniel Adaramola, is the Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) of Unity Bank Plc. With an extensive technology risk management background spanning 15+ years, Daniel has been instrumental to the success of several organization’s cybersecurity risk transformation program. Industries he has worked include: financial services, electronic payment, and consulting.

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