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Japa: 6 European countries to get work visa with ease

Japa: 6 European countries to get work visa at ease

Obtaining a work visa doesn’t have to be a cumbersome process, with proper preparation you can soon be on your way to working your dream job abroad.

While the application process varies, some European countries offer easier visa issuance.

Work visas permit you to live and work in a foreign country, and the type of visa you apply for depends on your specific situation.

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Here are 6 European countries to get a work visa at ease:

Estonia

Estonia, popular for its digital advancements and warm hospitality, stands out as the easiest country to secure a work visa, with a notably high acceptance rate for applications.

Despite receiving a comparatively smaller number of requests than other nations, Estonia has gained popularity for its streamlined visa processes.

The Digital Nomad Visa program in Estonia holds particular appeal for remote workers and freelancers. This initiative minimizes documentation requirements and aligns with the growing trend of digital work.

Opting for a D visa proves advantageous for individuals looking to engage in short-term projects or eager to commence work promptly. It also provides the flexibility to apply for a residence permit after arrival in Estonia.

Lithuania

Lithuania presents an appealing option for immigrant workers due to its straightforward work visa application process. To work in Lithuania, the initial step involves securing a job offer from a prospective employer within the country.

Once all relevant documents are duly submitted to the employer, it becomes their responsibility to initiate the work permit application process by submitting it to the Lithuanian Labor Exchange. This systematic approach simplifies the process for foreign workers aiming to embark on employment opportunities in Lithuania.

The work permit is issued by the Labour Exchange, and there’s an opportunity for non-EU citizens to work in Lithuania without the need for a permit. In cases where the job requires advanced professional qualifications, individuals have the option to obtain a decision affirming alignment with labor market needs.

Upon approval under this decision, the subsequent step involves applying for a temporary residence permit, replacing the need for a National visa (D) or a Lithuania Work Visa.

Iceland

Iceland provides a straightforward process for obtaining a work visa, requiring job seekers to have both a confirmed job offer and a residence permit for legal employment in the country.

Situated conveniently between Europe and North America, Iceland stands out not only for its breathtaking landscapes but also for fostering a healthy work-life balance. With an average workweek of 40 hours that is notably flexible, Iceland attracts numerous foreigners seeking relocation and work opportunities.

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The key prerequisite is securing a contract before initiating the visa application process.

Various work permits are available, including those for job roles requiring expert knowledge, addressing labor shortages, catering to athletes, facilitating family reunions, accommodating students, engaging specialized employees based on service contracts, and granted for special reasons.

Latvia

Latvia has become a sought-after destination for expatriates seeking employment abroad. Foreign individuals aiming to work in Latvia can achieve this by acquiring a combination of a residence permit, a type D visa, and a work permit.

It’s important to note that this requirement doesn’t extend to shareholders in Latvian companies, foreign nationals with a permanent residence permit, and managers of foreign companies representing a Latvian firm within the country.

For European Union (EU) nationals, the process is more straightforward as they are not obligated to obtain a work permit to work in Latvia. However, even though a work permit is not required, EU nationals must still apply for a residence permit if their stay exceeds 90 days.

Latvian work permits are categorized into type A which are issued for employment with a Latvian employer, types C and E are granted for intra-company transfers to Latvia, type D are issued for foreign businessmen visiting Latvia for meetings. While seasonal work visas are granted for specific timeframes, such as tourism or agricultural purposes.

Slovakia

Slovakia’s simplified work visa process, coupled with its transition to a market economy and a projected 3.4% economic growth in 2023, positions the country as an appealing destination for job seekers.

Generally, individuals aiming to work in Slovakia must secure a single permit encompassing residence and work authorization, which may include a work permit and temporary residence for employment, family reunification, or for third-country nationals with long-term residence status, requiring a work permit within the initial 12 months.

Slovakia offers diverse work visas which are, Slovakia Single Permits requiring employer-reported job vacancies, the employer reports the job vacancy to the Office of Labour 20 days before the residence application.

Work Permit for those with a temporary residence permit and want to work in the country. Seasonal Employment for up to 180 days; and the EU Blue Card for highly skilled professionals meeting criteria.

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The Czech Republic

Czechia, known as the Czech Republic, boasts a well-established work visa application process, drawing interest from job seekers and international businesses due to its strategic location and thriving economy.

The highly skilled and educated workforce further enhances its appeal to foreign nationals seeking employment opportunities abroad.

Various work visa types are available in Czechia. The Employee Card is issued for specific job positions and is extendable for two years. The EU Blue Card, a residence and work permit for university graduates, and The Intra-Company Employee Transfer Card for managerial, specialist, or trainee roles.

Business Visa (Type D) for long-term business activities and certain categories with free access to the labor market, including family members of Blue Card holders, individuals with permanent residency, and certain international students.