• Sunday, May 26, 2024
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Mahmud Albarnawy, son of ISWAP founder surrenders to NSCDC in Borno

85 terrorists feared killed as Boko Haram, ISWAP clashes in Borno

Mahmud Albarnawy, the eldest son of the late founder of the Islamic State of the West African Province (ISWAP), surrendered to the Nigerian Security and Civil Defence Corps (NSCDC) on Sunday in Maiduguri, Borno State.

His surrender marked a significant development in the ongoing fight against insurgency in the region.

After arriving in Maiduguri on May 11, Mahmud was debriefed and profiled by NSCDC officials.

His identity was confirmed as the eldest son of Mamman Nur following thorough profiling at the NSCDC Command Headquarters.

His surrender was reportedly facilitated by his uncle in Gamboru Ngala, who helped convey Mahmud to Maiduguri.

Mahmud revealed that he had fled from the Ali Ngulde camp in Mandara Mountain, Gwoza LGA, and had spent about a month in Gwange before moving to Gamboru Ngala.

Despite attempts by supporters of his late father to persuade him to return to the Lake Chad area and pledge loyalty to ISWAP, Mahmud refused, citing the execution of his father as a primary reason.

He admitted to participating in several attacks across Bama, Banki, Gwoza, and other locations as a middle-ranking Boko Haram member.

Following his debriefing, Mahmud was transferred to the Bulunkutu rehabilitation facility for further documentation and custody.

The surrender of Albarnawy is a notable event in the context of the region’s tumultuous history with extremist groups.

ISWAP, a faction that emerged from Boko Haram, has been a significant force of violence in the area.

The group was formed after Boko Haram pledged allegiance to ISIS in 2015, with internal conflicts leading to its eventual split.

Mamman Nur, Mahmud’s father, played a critical role in ISWAP’s formation and leadership until his death in 2018, when he was killed by his own fighters for allegedly releasing the Dapchi schoolgirls without demanding a ransom.

The Nigerian government’s efforts to combat terrorism continue, with the surrender of key figures like Mahmud Albarnawy being a crucial step in dismantling insurgent networks and restoring peace in the region.