• Saturday, June 15, 2024
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Shell lifts force majeure on Bonny Light exports

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Royal Dutch Shell’s Nigerian division lifted a force majeure on exports of Bonny Light crude oil on Thursday, the latest sign that Nigeria’s oil production is recovering after being hit by militant attacks in its oil-rich delta region.

The force majeure was lifted from 09:00 a.m. Nigerian time (0800 GMT) on Thursday, the company said in a statement, following restoration of production into Bonny Terminal.

Two other Nigerian crude oil grades – Forcados and Brass River – remain under force majeure. But the country’s oil production has remained resilient despite some of the worst militant attacts in decades on delta region oil facilities.

Oil prices rose during the attacks, which briefly pushed Nigeria’s production to 30-year lows. The country was Africa’s largest oil exporter, but dropped into second place behind Angola earlier this year due to the disruptions.

Still, some fields recovered more quickly than expected so that Nigeria’s exports were largely steady from April into May.

Exports are on track to rise in August, although the Niger Delta Avengers, the group that has claimed responsibility for the worst of the damage, have continued to attack oil installations.

Bonny Light exports had continued during the force majeure, a legal declaration made on May 11 following the closure of the Nembe Creek Trunk line. But cargo loadings are expected to run more smoothly now it has been formally lifted as these had been subject to repeated delays.

Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver, most often caused by a virus but sometimes by drug or alcohol abuse, other infections, or autoimmune diseases.

There are five main types, known as A, B, C, D and E.

According to the World Health Organization, types A and E are typically transmitted via contaminated food or water, while B, C and D usually occur from contact with body fluids of an infected person.

An estimated 95 percent of people are unaware of their infection, though treating hepatitis B and C can prevent the development of chronic liver disease.

Ninety-six percent of hepatitis deaths counted in the review were caused by types B and C, said the researchers. Most hepatitis deaths occurred in east and south Asia.

“We have tools at our disposal to treat this disease — we have vaccines to hepatitis A and B and we have new treatments to C,” for which there is no vaccine, said Cooke.

“However the price of new medicines is beyond the reach of any country — rich or poor.”

The review concluded with a call for a change in funding structures to “allow effective responses in low-income and lower-middle-income countries.”